Wet Aged Steak – Different Than Dry Aged

WHERE’S THE WET AGED STEAK IN CHICAGO?

The primary differences between “dry aged” and “wet aged” are the fact that wet aged steak is placed typically placed in a vacuum sealed bag, which allows the steak to retain its moisture content (dry aged, as is described by the words, allows the steak to dry out); and, since the wet aged steak retains its moisture, it also tends to retain its original weight better than dry aged steak. Also, “wet aged” steaks’ process is a lot quicker than day aged, i.e., a matter...

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Wet Aged Steak – Different Than Dry Aged

WHERE’S THE WET AGED STEAK IN CHICAGO?

The primary differences between “dry aged” and “wet aged” are the fact that wet aged steak is placed typically placed in a vacuum sealed bag, which allows the steak to retain its moisture content (dry aged, as is described by the words, allows the steak to dry out); and, since the wet aged steak retains its moisture, it also tends to retain its original weight better than dry aged steak. Also, “wet aged” steaks’ process is a lot quicker than day aged, i.e., a matter of days rather than weeks.

This is the dominant mode of aging beef in the U.S. today. Wet-aging is popular because of the fact that it takes less time than dry aged, i.e., a matter of days; and, since the moisture accumulates while in the vacuum bag, the actual amount of any weight loss is far less than that which results during the dry aging process since the longer the process takes, the greater the weight loss (even though the bags are “vacuum sealed”, this does not mean they are impenetrable, which allows some moisture to get lost through the evaporation process).

WHERE’S THE WET AGED STEAK IN CHICAGO?

During wet aging, the bag doesn't allow the meat to “breathe” freely, i.e., interact with surrounding air, so the steak intermixes with its own moisture content, primarily the blood. This give the steak more of a sourness taste and more of a blood serumy flavoring. While this sounds somewhat negative in regards to the taste of steak, the fact is that more than 90 percent of the beef bought, prepared, and cooked, is done so after a purchase made at a local grocery or supermarket chain where the steak is wrapped in a plastic-wrapped foam tray, i.e., the “wet aged” process. This is the steak that most of us eat and are used to, so it can't be all bad.

However, if you ever experience a dry aged steak, like the ones you will get at Chicago’s best steak restaurants, the difference is notable, and tastable. It’s hard to compare the two because the time element and the cost element clearly favor the wet aged steak process for American homes. It’s only those high-end, focused steak restaurants who can take the time and have the expertise to deliver the dry aged steak associated with fine tasting steak, as well as getting a premium amount for the necessity of a slower, more difficult aging period, and the handling and cooking expertise to takes to make it happen.

Chicago Best Steaks uses a number of measures to define the restaurant that offer the best steaks. First, the steak house must feature USDA “Prime” Beef on its menu; the steak house must also offer world-class service; and, stock an extensive supply of wines and spirits, in keeping with the enjoyment and atmosphere that are part and parcel of a great steak house.

Each of the steakhouses included on this site and in our guide is highly regarded by local and national media outlets such as Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, DiRoNA, Wine Spectator, and Zagat. So, you as a diner, will know that the quality of the meal and the ambiance of the restaurant will meet your strictest requirements and afford you a relaxing, enjoyable meal.

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